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09/02/2017 / Enterprise Risk Management, Risk Culture, Risk Manager

Our Top 5 Risk Management blogs in 2016

It is already February 2017. The year certainly feels like it is flying by. We are glad to see that our Risk Management Insights Blog continues to be read by thousands of professionals such as you, from all around the world. We all seem to receive a lot of information every day from many different sources. So to ensure that you didn't missed out on some of the articles that we have shared, we thought we would recap on some of our articles from 2016.

So we have made a selection of the '2016 Top five most read blogs'. We hope you enjoy the content and if you have not subscribed yet, just click here to receive the next articles directly in your Inbox. Enjoy.

1. What does it take to be a Risk Manager?

What are the key skills and characteristics needed to be successful in this role? Here is my list:

  • Risk management is to a large degree an art form. This requires a strong right hand (artistic) brain, able to cope with qualitative and inexact concepts and able to “see” into the future.
  • At the same time, the risk manager needs to be logical, analytical, problem-solving and exhibit a high degree of common sense.
  • The risk manager must be commercially astute and demonstrate a high degree of business acumen. Read more.

Operational Risk Management and the wider defined Enterprise Risk Management are often touted as a new concept. While the methodologies and processes employed may have been enhanced in the recent past, risk management is hardly new. Humans, arising from the instinct for survival, have been using and developing risk management techniques from the beginning of time. Continue reading here.

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06/01/2017 / Enterprise Risk Management, Risk Culture, ERM, Operational Risk, Risk Manager

Changing the Risk Conversation

Three Key Questions

Have you ever tried having a conversation with a risk practitioner about risk management concepts without using the word ‘risk’? Similarly, as a risk practitioner, have you had a conversation with a quality management practitioner without them mentioning the word ‘quality’?

One of the biggest issues we face as risk practitioners is having conversations with non-risk practitioners, especially front line people, about what we do and what we need them to do to ensure that risks, (there is that word again), are adequately identified, mitigated and monitored. Wouldn’t it be a more useful conversation to talk in terms that the front line is used to and understands? Read article 'Are you a Risk Manager?'

Front line staff know what they need to do to achieve their objectives – be it sales targets, transaction processing targets, customer satisfaction targets, quality targets, or whatever it is that they do that collectively allows the organisation to achieve its objectives. They understand their business processes and where shortcuts can be taken to ‘get things done’. They know when other staff are not following procedures – with malicious intent or not.

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27/09/2016 / Enterprise Risk Management, Risk Culture, Risk Maturity, Risk Manager

Successfully Implementing an Enterprise Risk Management System

5 factors of success

I was thinking about the characteristics of companies that make the decision to acquire and then successfully implement an Enterprise Risk Management software solution. Why? Well, we are in the business of providing software solutions to companies so we are always interested in understanding, why certain companies get more out of ERM solutions than others.  However, upon reflection, I think it is also important for companies on the ERM journey to reflect on these factors of success in their own decision-making process. So what are some of the factors of success?

1. Company Size – Does Size Matter?

Often company size is considered as a driver for moving to an ERM software solution. The bigger the company, the greater the need as there are more people involved in the process. Manually following up actions, treatment plans and risk assessment becomes more time-consuming and prone to errors. So generally speaking, we would expect some correlation between the number of ERM installations and size.

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03/06/2016 / Operational Risk, Key Risk Indicators, Risk Manager, KRIs

How do Key Risk Indicators work?


In February this year, I ran a blog highlighting the power of the human brain and its senses in acting as a personal key risk indicator (KRI) system for personal early warning risk awareness as we journey through this inherently risky world.

This blog looks at the potentially awesome power that a well-designed and well applied
KRI system can have in the business world.

KRIs have multiple purposes. The main one is to act as an early warning system to prompt initial investigation and response so as to deal with a risk early in its life. It helps a firefighting risk manager to become a proactive risk preventer. At a wider level, KRIs allow us to “measure” risk and incorporate risk into risk-based performance measurement, risk-based decision making and risk-based incentive schemes.

So how do KRIs work?

KRIs operate on the fact that as risk develops through its life, from root cause(s), through event(s) to final impact(s), red flags, symptoms and other evidence may be given off.  KRIs tap into this information and turn it into intelligence to then be investigated and acted upon to deal with the risk most appropriately.

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14/04/2016 / Bow Tie Analysis, Risk Culture, Risk Appetite, Risk Manager

Are you a risk manager?

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I am often asked “what are the key requirements that make a good risk manager?”  My first response is “to be able to walk on water”. Such is the required varied skill set of a good risk manager.

The roles and responsibilities of the risk manager are many and varied depending on the organization they belong to. I will use the example of an organization that has an independent risk management function where risk, and the day to day management thereof, is owned by the business. Let’s look at the key characteristics of the CRO and the staff of the independent function.

The main function of the independent risk manager is to review and challenge what the front line business is doing to manage risk. In addition, they should be seen as subject matter experts and assisters in developing and maintaining the risk management frameworks. They should be seen as value-adding and adopted by, and engaged with, front line staff.

What are the key skills and characteristics needed to be a success in this role? Here is my list:

  1. Risk management is to a large degree an art form. This requires a strong right hand (artistic) brain, able to cope with qualitative and inexact concepts and able to “see” into the future.

Read More